Book inventory

I love blogging! I drafted this post, and then I thought, ‘it’s a little disjointed’, ‘why this book isn’t with that book?’.  So after completely reorganising my books, hopefully now they are stored in a way that makes sense to you – it certainly makes more sense to me!  Oh and I decluttered two books that I wasn’t entirely proud to have listed :p

Firstly, books are largely hidden in my home, after spending a time in a room with a wall lined in books. I just find the visual too cluttery. So here’s what’s on show in my home:

Beside the radio

Radio - with CD players and a retro tape deck!

Radio – with CD players and a retro tape deck!

In the same shelves, above the radio

Ring binders

All my paper filing is in these two binders

And on the bed ledge

These are the ‘plan to read’ books.

These books have been there for at least 1 year.  Maybe they'll never get read?

These books have been there for at least 1 year. Maybe they’ll never get read?

  1. Israel is Real, Rich Cohen
  2. Each peach pear plum
  3. An intelligent life
  4. Holocaust sites of Europe

And here’s what’s hidden behind closed doors

Wardrobe

Some French novels, and some texts.  Even a 'how to get a job in 12 steps'

Some French novels, and some texts. Even a ‘how to get a job in 12 steps’

French Books (in French or about France)

  1. 12 steps to find a job
  2. The game master (Le maitre du jeu)
  3. Objectif Paris
  4. If it is a man (Si C’est un homme)
  5. Bonjour Tristess
  6. Bonjour tristesse
  7. Improve your French
Books that don't fit the other categories!

Books that don’t fit the other categories!

Gifts

  1. Poland <- a gift from a Polish friend when I studied in France
  2. The Bronze Horseman <- from an Aussie friend who visited Russia.  I read Paulina Simons ‘The Bronze Horseman’ and so I asked for the original poetry.  But I can’t read cryllic!

Other books

  1. Honeymoon with my brother – Franz Wiesner
  2. The Christmas Mystery – Jostein Garder
  3. Plan B – L.R. Brown <- all about alternative ways in life.  Like no flush toliets, and Chinese meat consumption and global warming

The Back Row

To the left, there's mainly holocaust books, to the right there's spirituality/mental health

To the left, there’s mainly holocaust books, to the right there’s spirituality/mental health

The book end to the back row - all holocaust themed

The book end to the back row – all holocaust themed

Holocaust Books

  1. The holocaust odyssey of Daniel Bennahmias, Sonderkommando
  2. Night, E. Wiesel
  3. Eyewitness Aushwitz, F. Muller
  4. Among the righteous, R. Satloff
  5. Ester and Ruzya – Masha Gessen, Masha Gessen
  6. The Seamstress – a memoir of survival, S. T. Bernstein, L.L. Thornton & M. Berstein Samuels
To the left, there's mainly holocaust books, to the right there's spirituality/mental health

To the left, there’s mainly holocaust books, to the right there’s spirituality/mental health

Holocaust Books

  1. Parrallel Lines
  2. Hiding Edith
  3. Mosaic
  4. The Messanger
  5. Auschwitz, Auschwitz, How can I forget you
  6. Human Smoke
  7. Safe Passage – Ida Cook
  8. American Heroine in the French Resistance

Spirituality/Mental health

  1. Mister God, this is Anna
  2. Affluenza
  3. Growing to Maturity
  4. Finding happiness
  5. The mindful way through depression
  6. The invitation

Linen/pantry closet

The top left hand shelf on my pantry/linen closet hybrid holds all these binders and books.  There's 3 travel journals, two stamp collecting binders and all sorts of university and floristry course notes

The top left hand shelf on my pantry/linen closet hybrid holds all these binders and books. There’s 3 travel journals, two stamp collecting binders and all sorts of university and floristry course notes

  1. Striped book – Inspirations book from 2006
  2. Spiral bound black book – more inspirations
  3. Photo album from high school
  4. Blue display book (empty)
  5. First travel journal from 2006
  6. Second travel journal from 2006
  7. Third travel journal from 2007 onwards
  8. Plastic case of brochures for future employers etc
  9. Binder of bank statements from France – 2006 onwards
  10. Empty binder
  11. Stamp collection (Australian)
  12. Stamp collection (foreign)
  13. Binder of floristry assignments and remaining notes
These are the more readily used books, living in the linen closet too

These are the more readily used books, living in the linen closet too

  1. Tax envelope for this year’s receipts
  2. Receipts of clothing spending, electrical items, scooter related costs
  3. Writing paper and envelopes
  4. Lists book
  5. Atlas
  6. The Sweet Poison Quit plan
  7. Humourous check list
  8. Journal from 2011-12 (with lists to move house etc)
  9. Emergency

There you go, I think that’s about all of the permanent resident books in my house. There’s a constant cycle of library books, of course.  I pretty much won’t buy a published book now days – between the library, my mother’s house (which feels like a library) and my uncle owning a book store, I have an endless source, it would seem!  I will only buy 2nd hand books when I am heading overseas, and leave them there.  How do you think I did?  Minimal?

This entry was posted in House, Inventory, Minimalism, Organisation

18 Responses

  • That is a really wide assortment of books! I'd be interested to know how your interest in the Holocaust came about.

    Reply
    • It started with *When HItler stole pink rabbit* which was read to me in Year 6. I also like apocalypse movies, so I'd say I like the 'what if' about life, and how people survive.

      Reply
      • I read Anne Frank and The Summer of My German Soldier when I was quite young, and have read lots of others since, including Night by Elie Wiesel. I saw the documentary series "Shoah" and visited the Holocaust Museum in Washington DC. But I always read about those times from the Jewish perspective and I don't read books about Nazism.

        Reply
        • The Germans really seem to have totally stepped down/backed down from what happened. That being said, a lot of the Jewish museums I visit do go into the "why" without being pro Nazi. You're right though, the Jewish "side" has a far stronger reach than many other events.

          Reply
  • Oh! It is all very minimal and I love the "book nook" arrangements. I also prefer less visual clutter (would love some bookcases with doors!)

    So many students at my school ask me for Elie Wiesel's "Night." I'll have to add that to the list!

    You speak French 🙂 🙂 🙂 Have you read any of Camus' novels?

    Severe envy that you have only two (2!) paper binders!!!

    Reply
    • I haven't read Camus in French except for an exert. I really should but I haven't read those French books on the shelves beyond a few pages. There are some binders in the garage which I forgot til now.

      I think "Night" is a studied text in the US high schools- it certainly seemed very well known at the holocaust museum in Washington DC.

      Reply
  • Lots of visual book clutter here I'm afraid. Not sure where I'd hide them all! I'm in awe of you, who though clearly a book lover and keen reader, manages to keep it minimalist!

    Reply
  • Extremely minimalist! I'm one of those people with a whole wall lined with bookshelves. 🙂 Actually, I moved them all there from various places in my flat with the plan to hang curtains in front of them, making the whole place feel less cluttered and, you know, improving the feng shui. The only thing is that once I'd done it, I really, really liked it and I can happily spend hours (well, minutes probably but it feels like hours) looking at it all. I did get rid of a lot of books before I moved and could get rid of a few binders of stuff now but I hope I'll always have the space to have lots of books around. I'm one of those people who likes to read books over and over though – if I borrow a book from the library and really enjoy it, it will probably make its way onto a list of books to buy sometime but I have gotten much better about not holding onto books that I'm not likely to read again (happens with a lot of book club books and books people buy me as presents, it seems). I will get around to hanging those curtains one day though – partly because it probably will make my sitting room less cluttered looking but also to try and help cut down on the amount of dust that gathers. And also to give me somewhere to hide the hoover.

    Reply
    • Interestingly, I'm not a huge re-reader, which helps me rationalise which books I part with. I like the curtain idea you mention – I know Ikea has some great curtain hanging hardware. I agree, it's a shame when you're gifted a book and it's not really a 'keepable' one, but I'm getting more and more ruthless with gifts and them becoming clutter!

      Reply
  • I'm impressed with how you can move books on. (And I'm jealous that you have an uncle who owns a bookshop.) So we can see your different genres. Why are you hanging onto the Holocaust books? What is your aim with the French books? Are they part of future plan?

    My problem is I bring in more books than I can read, as in I don't have enough time and then I see more books I want to read and buy them before I've read my last lot. I have cut back significantly but still buy a lot – new and second hand.

    My aim is to only have the quantity of books that fit on my existing bookshelves. I like seeing books – as long as they are piled nicely or on bookshelves. I find a minimalist house without any books on display soulless. I like to talk about books and ideas, and when I visit people I like to look at what they are reading, talk about their reading and get ideas for my own reading. People that read are more interesting. I know this is increasingly difficult in the era of ebooks. But I'm an old fashioned kinda gal.

    Reply
    • The holocaust books are collected all over the world from Jewish museums. I feel some of them aren't possible to buy in Australia. So it's a collection I allow myself. The French books stay because I should read them to develop my French and keep it fresh. But it's less leisurely to read vs English books.

      I also have a constant "to read" list but if it's not at the library, I miss out. If it happens to be Christmas or birthday I'll suggest it as a gift (my family don't do experience gifts).

      Reply
  • I'm impressed by how you've managed to keep your books down, especially given how much you read 🙂 Do you live near the library?

    When I moved to Queensland I bought the tallest bookcase I could find, and every time it fills up I cull books. Well that's the plan anyway – I have somehow ended up with a separate "to read" pile, so need to work on that.

    I had the same stamp binders as a kid 🙂

    Reply
    • Welcome home!

      Those stamps binders were popular! I have two libraries nearby, one on the way home from work and one walking distance from home. I read daily about decluttering before I moved to my own place, so I got ruthless with books when I thought of moving them. I think setting a physical constraint on things is a great way to keep things in control.

      Reply
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  • You're so precious. And you do have books all over your house! Looks like you're interested in a little bit of everything, very interesting reads! We downsized last year. I pressured my husband to get rid of a few books. He likes to collect but not read them. And I can't take the clutter. But we compromised. If anymore books come in, that many more have to go out. And I broke down & got rid of the majority of mine that I had already read. Or that I knew I would never read. Now, it's livable.
    Thank you so much for visiting my blog. I Have a lot of posts presently come out but that won't last for long. Most I wrote a year or Two ago but never published them for some reason. I think the fun part was just writing them for me. So when we were stuck in the hotel room I cleaned out my draft folder & just started scheduling them to go out. When I run out I might stop blogging, depends on time. The baby is a time eater! But blogging is such fun when I meet people like you!

    Reply
    • Hey Jennifer – it is fun to create a whole new little community from blogging, but it does take time, that's for sure! I suggested my parents (who love books) implement the same policy of 'in/out' but you've got to be vigilant! At least they read all theirs! There's just so many you can never find something when you want to loan it to someone. I'm totally with you on not liking the clutter though!

      Reply
  • Thank you for the great information!

    Reply


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