House Inventory

Inspired again, by An Exacting Life, I decided I should do a house inventory.  Over a few months, I’ve share a number of posts, and this is the post that links them all together in one place.

What also prompted me to do this fiddly task was the fact that  when my contents insurance came due, I asked about what the insured value was.  It seems they annually increase the amount insured.  A smart idea for most people.  But I wondered when I first got the policy if it wasn’t a little overstated on the contents value – so I was wary when it increased again for the next year.

I worried ‘what if they know something I don’t know’.  I thought I could sit down with a nice spreadsheet, and work room by room to work out what I have, what I paid for it, and what it might cost to replace. The bulk of my ‘stuff’ was purchased in the last 18 months, since I moved.  In 90% of those cases, I have the receipt filed.

Some was bought prior to 2012, such as my bed, the mattress and other ‘bedroom’ stuff.  I was lucky to be ‘gifted’ some appliances,  and I took all sorts of things from Mum and Dad’s house (with permission of course).  Where things were purchased in the past, or ‘stolen’ – I’ve worked out the replacement costs. From privacy’s sake, I’ve not shared the cost of items in my posts, but there’s lots of lovely photos.

I did not include my stationary as it was of negligible value.  In the event my place burnt down, the replacement of these items would be on an as needed basis.  Also, a lot of the stuff was from when i was a student, and I ‘worked’ from home.  Now that I work in an office, my access to stationary is sufficient at work that I need a much smaller collection at home.

Lastly, this post is of my stuff – there’s more now that we’re two households, and I’m planning a cheeky poem to outline the duplication (in the form of ‘The 12 Days of Christmas’).

What do you think I might have missed?  I certainly haven’t counted all my screws, but they are pictured in my ‘buffet drawers’ post.

This entry was posted in House, Inventory, Lists

5 Responses

  • I was originally going to count only items worth more than about $20, but I realized I had dozens of collections made of small items. So I have counted the number and will come up with an average figure (for example, the list price on my DMC floss/cross stitch thread is 75 cents each and I probably have 250 colours.) I have also not given a price to things I would never replace. One good tip I found is that you should take photos of things like flooring, lighting fixtures and curtains, if you replaced them or they cost above the average value. I look forward to your update in song!

    Reply
    • Oh yes that's a good idea – things like carpets and curtains would cost to replace, even if they are 'legacy' to the place you live in. Actually we have lovely wooden floors now, and they are a little worse for wear now – I think they were brand new, so it's not surprising having real people is impacting it a little.

      There are definitely would be things I wouldn't rush out and replace – things that I wrap gifts in, even cook books. So it seems pointless to worry too much about them in an inventory.

      Reply
  • I got new quotes on contents insurance recently. The thing they all highlighted was the importance of listing 'special value' items e.g. jewellery, camera equipment, laptops etc. Every insurer has different rules about the $$$ value listed for each individual item for high-value items.

    What about the value of Clothes? And not forgetting those lovely shoes!!! 🙂

    Reply
    • Woops! Sorry – you already have clothes on the list! 🙂

      Reply
    • They did ask if I had any specific jewellery to list, and I checked the BF didn't want his watch included (he didn't). I don't think cameras or laptops came up – though my camera isn't technically mine, and neither is the laptop :p

      You're right – i need to do a shoes inventory! Yay, I love a good photo session! And another chance to show those $300 shoes

      Reply


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